EU couldn’t tame the …snail

Let’s suppose the UK’s decision to exit the European Union somehow reflected the belief that the parliamentary sovereignty was curtailed by the supremacy of EU law. Then why there isn’t a complaint about the curtailed by the Common Law?
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The House of Commons approval of Britain’s entry to the European Economic Community on the 28th of October 1971, was followed by triumphing over the new era in the wider European territory, as a warm welcome to the aftermaths of the second world war. Germany was escaped from Nazism, French and Italian dictatorship defeated. Building the european unity was the solid and capable answer to the Soviet Union. Although discussing that reshaped European regime, we shall first admit the critical difference between Eastern and the other Europeans with British people. Britain never felt a need to escape from its past. It is like the romance melody of Britain culture; they always preferred wallowing in the past to confronting the future, and for them the nation-state is something to be celebrated, not to be transcended. The culmination of that melody can be heard in a comparison study of Manga Charta with the French Revolution and European Enlightenment or the ideas behind the books of Baron de Montesquieu and Rigas Ferrao.

Brexiting always existed; it existed geologically, culturally, and historically. Unlike most countries of the European continent, Britain’s history was globally imperial, and that has given a profound sense of exceptionalism. Culturally, we shall mention the famous “Bruges speech of 1988”, where the Iron Lady stated, “we have not embarked on the business of throwing back the frontiers of state at home only to see a European superstate getting ready to exercise a new dominance from Brussels”.

Furthermore, a question arises as to whether the UK ever an honest EU member was. But that question has to be answered through another question. Was the EU’s seven-time geographical enlargement a genuine celebration or a revolutionised transcendence orchestrated by technocrats?

This essay discusses if the UK’s decision to exit the European Union reflects the belief that the supremacy of EU law curtailed parliamentary sovereignty. That argument includes an accusation that British culture cares in a populist way about the origin of each law rule or legal practice. This accusation quickly collapsed when we realized that the Common Law legal system is like a glass of water and oil. There is the statute mechanism, and there is the actual Common Law and Equity, each bundle with its own power sources and tradition.

The essay’s author has decided to begin by explaining why a little snail was able to defeat the effectiveness of European Supremacy.

● @Academia

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